MOVIE TRAILERS

Must Watch: Full Trailer for Tarantino's Western 'The Hateful Eight'

by
November 5, 2015
Source: YouTube

The Hateful Eight Trailer

"Now what would make a man brave a blizzard and kill in cold blood? I'm sure I don't know…" Yeehaw! The Weinstein Company has debuted the full-length trailer for Quentin Tarantino's brand new, snowy revenge western The Hateful Eight. The film mostly takes place in one lodge in the middle of a blizzard, where eight bounty hunters end up stuck for the night. This looks so awesome, and it's a helluva trailer to get you excited to find out what tricks Tarantino has up his sleeves. The film features quite an impressive cast: Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Michael Madsen, Zoe Bell, Tim Roth, Bruce Dern, Demian Bichir, Walton Goggins & Channing Tatum, too. Don't miss this trailer!

Here's the full theatrical trailer for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, direct from YouTube:

You can still watch the first teaser trailer for The Hateful Eight here, to see even more footage.

The Hateful Eight Poster

The Hateful Eight is written and directed by Quentin Tarantino (Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Jackie Brown, Kill Bill, Inglourious Basterds, Django Unchained). Six or eight or twelve years after the Civil War, a stagecoach hurtles through the wintry Wyoming landscape carrying bounty hunter John Ruth (Kurt Russell) and his fugitive Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh) towards the town of Red Rock where Ruth, known in these parts as “The Hangman,” will bring Domergue to justice. But their journey is about to get disrupted by a blizzard, leaving them stranded at Minnie's Haberdashery with six other travelers (Samuel L. Jackson, Walton Goggins, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern and Demian Bichir), and they might not all make it out alive. The Weinstein Company will open The Hateful Eight in a limited 70mm roadshow release starting on December 25th, 2015, Christmas Day, later this year. We'll see ya'll in theaters then.

Find more posts in To Watch, Trailer

Discover more on ZergNet:

  • TXSteadyEddie
    I wonder how much Tarantino's recent tirades are going to hurt the box office for this film. Word has it that Weinstein is very "disgruntled" about the whole deal, well we'll see soon.
    • TheOct8pus
      It won't affect it at all in Europe.....and most Tarantino fans could care less, or agree with what he said, so I doubt it's going to hurt the box office tremendously. We'll see.....
      • My whole family plan on seeing it twice a day for an entire week just to send a message to all the bad cops out there.
        • heidi jo bean
          I said the same thing yesterday when someone posted a boycott! I plan on seeing it at least twice.
    • Weinstein actually stand behind him they said.
  • TheOct8pus
    I have a feeling there will be dead bodies....
  • Craige Marshall
    everyone i know is going star wars crazy this Christmas, but I for one cannot wait to see this!
    • John Doe
      Amen.
  • Matthew
    I'm not even sure I like this. I'm intrigued because it's a QT film but there is nothing that got me excited. =/
    • Higgens
      It has Kurt Russel......what else do you need. Did I mention Kurt Russel?
      • tommyturner
        How about Kurt Russell?
        • Higgens
          With a Grand mustache no less.
  • mzungu
    Looked worst that the leaked script that I read... Looked like I am going to see "The Revenant" instead.
    • Bo
      Good choice as there is really no comparison between the two. Revenant has a chance to be a very gritty, very intense really great movie. This 8 stuff looks pretty bad and I liked the script. I didn't like the acting here and am totally tired of the same ole S. Jackson schtick! I'll take Leo and especially Tom Hardy any day of the week. Of course, one could go see both. Righto cheerio?
      • shiboleth
        Elegantly and wisely put, sir! Will follow your lead on this one ...
        • Bo
          Well, thank you, shiboleth. This is the kind of engagement and response to my post(s) that I really enjoy. Nice to be agreed with and appreciated. Thanks again!
          • shiboleth
            Sorry for late response. Anyway, I also find Tarantino quite ambivalent director. Overusing style over substance. It's like his movies are unfinished, like there's always something that is missing. And he pretty deliberately pushes playing with the violence. I somehow am not always in the mood for it. So, I am also glad to be agreed with ...
          • Bo
            Well said and no need for the apology on the response as better late than never, as they say. Although the politeness is very appreciated. As to regarding The Revenant...check out the Richard Harris film from 1970 or '71 titled Man In The Wilderness. Exact same story of the exact same character. Quite a good American '70's movie. John Huston, although he did not direct, is in it and that's never a bad thing. Later gator. Cheers!
          • shiboleth
            I'm late again, but I can't just leave it without response. Let me try be short as much as possible. Anyway, thanks for the tip, although I know for that one. But will check it out sometimes...
          • Bo
            But will check it out sometimes...? That doesn't make sense, shiboleth. I get the feeling that English might not be your native language. Where are you from? Anyway, so you've heard/seen of Man In The Wilderness? I'm impressed. And you'll check it out sometimes? ...lol... sorry...just havin' a little fun with you. Peace and cheers!
          • shiboleth
            Dear Bo, believe me, I can't see it right away for numerous reasons. One of them being finding it (I'm in Europe, we already talked about it, Croatia). Besides that, I have a lot of films I want to see before. I simply don't rush into watching them. Not that I don't appreciate your suggestion or the film itself, but, I also do a lot of different things in the same time. And did I mention it; I mostly work with and do books, which means they are my main interest and love. Yes, I read them, I write about them reviews sometimes (bad word, obviously, which I apologize for), I translate them, I write my own articles in some magazines and some of them get to be published in books. Films are my love, but not centrally... I didn't want to hurt your good intentions, but, when I say sometimes, I don't think incidentally...
          • Bo
            Thank you for your very kind reply, shiboleth. You are a nice, polite, and intelligent guy. I very much appreciate that when engaging in discussions on internet forums. Yes, I thought we had discussed you being in Europe, but I'd forgotten, actually. Sorry. And please, no need to worry about 'hurting' my good intentions. I enjoy suggesting older films to those I deem intelligent and knowledgeable regarding films. I've to requirements that they must go see them immediately or even at all. But thanks for your heartfelt concern. Again, I like how polite and considerate you are. Books. Yes, I am a very big reader. I read many, many more books than I see films. Especially these days as most films, especially American ones, I simply do not care for. I might read close to 100 books a year. I'm always reading something. Sometimes two at a time. One fiction and the other non-fiction. I like so many different writers. Jo Nesbo. Hanning Mankell, who just passed away. Ken Bruen. God, there's so many. It really is my passion and favorite thing to do. I'm retired, from the film biz so have a lot of time on my hands. I recently discovered an American writer by the name of Joe R. Lansdale and have been reading a lot of his books. He's very good, very funny. Try Paradise Sky. Lead character is a black man and it's a Western. Just excellent. Quite amusing. (Don't worry, I know you have no time, just thought I'd mention it) He also wrote The Thicket with the lead character being a dwarf and they are soon to make a film of it with a European director and the actor from Game of Thrones (who happens to be a dwarf and is an excellent actor). Anyway, good for you being able to review books and translate them. And get paid for doing so. Excellent. Always nice engaging with you, shiboleth. Take care.
          • shiboleth
            I guess nobody's gonna stop us here talking about this things. So, Bo, you are retired, as you said yourself, from film biz and you read a hundred of books a year (or around that number). I can imagine that for myself when I get retired. But, probably, although I'm not sure of it, I will have to watch more movies to make it even since I prefer reading books. Just funny thought, anyway. No, I'm not mocking that idea, I am loving it since I would like to be retired on some basis and would love very much to have much more time to read and write. And to watch more movies. Thank you for your compliments. You are also someone with nice manners and polite at that. Definitely a person of huge experience. I'm glad I can communicate with you. You might be even someone known in the film industry. That doesn't have to be important in all this since that wouldn't change a thing in this conversation. I also like that reading logic: one fiction and one non-fiction. That rhythm is something I'm also trying to keep. For a long time, I was reading (which might be odd for some) only non-fiction. Last few years that changed and I try to catch up what I missed in literature.But, my reading really demands some discipline since I'm trying to write a doctorate (no, I don't work at some university although I am connected with it in some respect). Funny thing about that is that I don' have to do it for some promotion in my line of work but because I want to do it. And yeah, to make it more silly, I'm paying for it. So, I read a lot of classic books about philosophy, history, culture and literature. And there are few books about the films, of course. A thing most people don't do nowadays. I don't believe a lot of those books would have any meaning for you, unless you can't imagine what classics from philosophy and literature exist ... You are probably profound guy in many respects,but I don't think you want to loose time on connecting realism, modernism and postmodernism through literature, history, philosophy and films. I also work in the school for a moment (I have a child and constant inflow of money must be guaranteed). I do translations of articles about Shakespeare for national radio station (yes, I also translated more then ten books - luckily, none of them is about Shakespeare). I am also an editor in one of the philosophical journal. Yeah, writing reviews (mostly on non-fiction) too, but lately not so often. And, of course, I work with several publishing houses on different projects. On the end, I'm trying to write something good. It sounds like it's very much and that I'm making myself important. No, I mostly feel tired but very motivated to do many different things. Some of those things don't pay off financially and some do. So, films, where they find their place in all this? Well, I also love them. It's like marathon for me. I'm trying to keep up with watching them as much as I can. Unfortunately, you are right about American films. However, now and then there are some worth my attention. Your suggestion, as I told you, is also on the list. That means that I will make it my own assignment to find and see Man In The Wilderness and to report it back to you with my impressions. I might not be too fast about it but I will do it since I would do it anyway. Don't you worry, it will be a genuine pleasure. p.s. Bo, I have a little black notebook where I write all the books I want to read but I didn't have the time to do it. So, I wrote all your suggestions (although, that Scandinavian guy, Jo Nesbo, is well known here and I already have him on my mind) in it. Just to let you know. Nice talking to you, Bo. Enjoy yourself ... Anyway, I overwrote all this
          • Bo
            Loved reading all that you 'overwrote' this time. You seem to be a very busy guy. And I'm impressed with what you are busy with. I too am a father and my daughter is fully grown and 47 years old. My granddaugher is 27 yrs. old. Both wonderful beautiful women. Yea, I've read a lot of philosophy from Nietzsche (whom I enjoyed and learned a lot from; actually Francis Coppola suggested I read him when I worked on a film with him) to Kierkegaard and Otto Rank's wonderful Art and the Artist. Great book. Colin Wilson's The Outsider had an impact on me and helped me understand myself. My favorite of all these is the great, great book by Ernest Becker titled The Denial of Death. One of the great works ever presented to us to understand the human condition. I read it first in the 1970's and have re-read it again and again thru all these years. Actually learned of it from Woody Allen's movie Annie Hall when Annie hands a book to Woody when they are separating and tells him it must be his as it's about death. Very funny, but it's The Denial of Death. Isn't that a great way to learn of one of the heaviest books ever written? Becker also wrote Escape From Evil and Angels in Armor. Good books, but Denial of Death is his masterpiece! I chuckled when you suggested I might be known as I used to work in the film biz. I am very happy to report that I am not and wouldn't want to be as this whole obsession with celebrity and fame is too insane for me to be involved in whatsoever. The only people I'm known to are the people I worked with on several films, a few of those films being very well known internationally. And that's been many years so perhaps, if I'm lucky, I'm forgotten. I have for the last 10 years or so read and involved myself, on my own, with spiritual enlightenment and what that is about and how one achieves this enlightenment or truth realization. What I've discovered after intense studying and searching is that one doesn't as enlightenment literally means to lose one's self so one never obtains it because the obtaining of it means there is no one there to do it. Follow my drift?...lol... I'm chuckling as it's a unsolvable mystery and that's part of enlightenment too, to realize that and accept that the human mind is incapable of understand the infinite. As Ram Dass is known to have said, "The game is not becoming someone, but becoming no one." Right out of the wonderful Tao Te Ching. Anyway, I ramble...sorry...good to exchange conversations with you. It would no doubt be very pleasant to have a cup of tea and chat with you. Take care and good luck and best wishes with all your endeavors, shiboleth.
  • DAVIDPD
    I want to believe Kurt's facial hair was real while filming this one. // Damn peoples! This looks like some kind of awesome.
    • Terry Craig
      I'm pretty sure it is; He appeared on some Late Night talk show with that beardage. After all, it's Kurt effing Russell.
      • DAVIDPD
        Yeah, I bet he just needs a good night's rest to grow it anyhow.
  • shiboleth
    Yeah, it looks very bad ass, but, I just don't know what to feel about it. I'll put it in the large and overcrowded department called: 'will see it someday. probably'.
  • Stefan Kuhlmann
    I feel weird about this. I love Tarantino. Of course. But I am also kinda sick of Tarantino. This seems like QT pushing all those QT buttons...all nice and fine but...maybe it will once again blow me away...maybe it just won't.
  • ari smulders
    Awesome! But every Tarantino movie is worth watching....
  • John Doe
    Here's hopin that this ends up bein my favorite movie of the year.
  • kitano0
    Haven't really liked QT since the KB's. Waiting for KB3. Nice to see Kurt Russell getting lots of work, though...most underrated actor out there.
    • Is this how it's possible to earn ninety-seven bucks /hr...? After being un-employed for 6 months, I started freelancing over this web-site and now I cannot be happier. After 4 months on my new job my income is round about dollars 7500/per month working 20hrs a week .. For web address open my ṖRὀÍLÊ ℄87
  • Dotpols
    Taratino's movies just seem to get more fun and stylish every time. This looks like it'll be awesome - can't wait.

FEATURED POSTS

POPULAR COMMENTS

OUR FAVORITES

Alex's Top 10 - 2016
1. La La Land
2. Paterson
3. Arrival
4. Captain Fantastic
5. 20th Cent. Women
6. Pete's Dragon
7. Jackie
8. Kubo & Two Strings
9. Everybody Wants
10. Wilderpeople
Click Here for Thoughts

Jeremy's Top 10 - 2016
1. Moonlight
2. The Handmaiden
3. High-Rise
4. Elle
5. Arrival
6. Kubo & Two Strings
7. 13th
8. Jackie
9. Toni Erdmann
10. The Witch
Click Here for Thoughts

FOLLOW US HERE

Subscribe to our feed or daily newsletter:
Follow Alex's main profile on twitter:
For the news posts only, follow this acct:
Add our feed to your Feedly: follow us in feedly

FACEBOOK + LINKS