OBITUARIES

Legendary Horror Filmmaker George A. Romero Has Died at Age 77

by
July 16, 2017
Source: LA Times

George A. Romero

Oh no, we've lost a real legend. American filmmaker George A. Romero has died at age 77, as confirmed by LA Times. Romero is best known as the originator of the modern zombie movie, as the director of the original B&W zombie feature film Night of the Living Dead from 1968, as well as numerous other zombie sequels and films and series in the last 50 years. Romero died in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles with his family after a battle with lung cancer. The last film he directed was the 2009 zombie flick Survival of the Dead, and he was also involved in producing Road of the Dead and the Deadtime Stories series. Sad news.

Romero is undoubtedly a filmmaking legend, having established himself as a prominent figure in the horror world for nearly five decades. His influence on the genre can be seen in so many different films over the years, and in other filmmakers. Here's a quote from LA Times' article, as well as a few remembrance tweets:

Romero died Sunday in his sleep following a "brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer," according to a statement to The Times provided by his longtime producing partner, Peter Grunwald. Romero died while listening to the score of one his favorite films, 1952’s “The Quiet Man,” with his wife, Suzanne Desrocher Romero, and daughter, Tina Romero, at his side, the family said.

George A. Romero was born in February of 1940 in New York City. He was raised in the Bronx, and would frequently ride the subway into Manhattan to rent film reels to view at his house. His very first feature was the seminal Night of the Living Dead in 1968, though he spent a few years experimenting with more horror making Season of the Witch (1972), The Crazies (1973), and Martin (1978), before returning to zombies and delivering the classic Dawn of the Dead (1978) set in a shopping mall. He graduated from Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, and most of his films are set in/around the Pittsburgh area. He had a recent return to zombies with the films: Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2007), Survival of the Dead (2009).

Romero will leave a lasting legacy in cinema, and will still continue to influence filmmakers. Rest in peace.

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  • DAVIDPD
    "What is dead may never die." // The legend will always live on through the films & the genre Romero gave us.
  • Charles Knowlton
    I'll never forget the first time I watched Night Of The Living Dead. I couldn't have been more than 11 or 12 years old. I snuck downstairs late at night because my parents would never have let me see it and it was one of those movie moments you never forget. I've been a zombie movie fan ever since.
    • TheOct8pus
      Great movie....one of the first low-budget, huge box-office horror films. Not to mention the fact that the film and its sequels were social commentaries
  • Dawn of the Dead is a favourite, but loved Night of the Living Dead too. RIP mister.
  • Bo
    Interesting land very unique filmmaker, but I've never really liked any of his movies as zombies have never been my thing.
    • Never watched one of his movies. Hate Zombies.
      • Bo
        Can't say the same, tarek...but almost. I watched Dawn of the Dead back when it first came out. It was kinda funny and I appreciated the allegorical aspects of it, but I hate zombie movies and the walking dead nonsense too...talk about saturating the culture with this stuff...man on man.. I still can't believe Brad Pitt did that World War Z junk. The book got a lot of buzz and I couldn't even get thru it...the movie was mediocre zombie fare at best. Strange that Pitt not only did that but apparently is doing Z2 with Fincher directing? That's really strange. Cheers!
    • TheOct8pus
      Not all his movies are zombie films. Monkey Shines was fun....the Dark Half had its moments (knowing the book helps)
      • Bo
        Thanks for your reply. Being the film guy I've been for so many years and knowing who Romero was I never really had much interest in him as a filmmaker. I actually hadn't heard of any of the movies you just mentioned. Hmmmmmm....lol...cheers.
  • theslayer5150
    Martin Landau passed away as well
  • son_et_lumiere
    a sad day. irrespective of whether you enjoy his films or not (i do), certainly a rarity in that he was a man who genuinely changed the direction of cinema, at least in particular genres. impressive he made Night of the Living Dead at only 28, while Martin remains as much a study of psychology as it is a film about someone who drinks blood. social commentary and shocks galore, and yet another one goes who is often imitated but never bettered. due his best known films being about the living dead, i did momentarily hesitate about saying 'Rest in peace, Mr Romero.' i didn't know the guy, but he'd probably like that! thanks to @theslayer5150:disqus for highlighting the sad demise also of Landau. not a great day. farewell, Commander Koenig.

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