REVIEWS

Review: 'Primer' Meets 'Chronicle' in Found Footage 'Project Almanac'

Project Almanac

What would happen if you found a time machine when you were in high school. What would you change? How would you use it? And what would be the ramifications of its use? These are some of the questions that a new film called Project Almanac tries to address. Following in the footsteps of the found footage film Chronicle, this film has a similar style and feel, but is about a group of teens who discover plans for a time travel device and put it together on their own (like Primer). They start testing it, using it, and improving its powers, until everything starts to go wrong. It's a blast, an original and energetic creation with a few issues.

 Posted 21 hours ago in ComicCon, Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: Luc Besson's 'Lucy' Wastes Big Ideas on Blockbuster Action

Lucy

Whether suiting up as Black Widow or luring oafish, young men to their otherworldly demise in Under the Skin, or wrangling Joaquin Phoenix with her voice alone in Her, Scarlett Johansson appears to be the ideal choice to play the next-level woman, a female character made supernatural with all the powers she beholds. So thank goodness writer/director Luc Besson has her front and center in Lucy, his latest sci-fi, evolutionary actioner that promises to blow your mind as well as your entertainment meter. Without Johansson, the film would slip by as pretty thin on both excitement and existentialism. Thankfully, Lucy doesn't fail in either department, but the frustration that the whole, messy ordeal leaves behind is far too noticable. Not quite as noticable as someone as stunning and talented as Johansson, but it's there. Read on!

 Posted July 24 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: 'The Purge: Anarchy' Triumphs Where Its Predecessor Tanked

The Purge: Anarchy

Future sequel-makers in the horror field should pay attention to The Purge: Anarchy. The follow-up to last summer's dystopian action/thriller does so much more with what this franchise has been given by writer/director James DeMonaco. With The Purge, DeMonaco envisioned a new America, one with minimal unemployment and even lower crime rate. The annual Purge, 12 hours when all crime, including murder, is perfectly legal, satisfies the animalistic cravings of the population. The first film was a wasted opportunity, confining itself to a single home invasion and not even doing a very good job of it. Unlike the citizens of the Purged nation, moviegoers weren't satisfied, demanding much more from the cool premise.

 Posted July 18 in Horror, Review | Comments

Review: 'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes' Evolves to New Heights

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

"We're such little creatures. Poor humanity's so fragile, so weak. Little, little animals." So said Edward Chapman at the end of H.G. Wells' 1936 sci-fi, war, epic, Things to Come. Wells' animal reference in regards to human beings falls under both fact and metaphor. We are all animals, but something darker, more vicious, seems to always be growing at the heart of this humanity we call ourselves. It wouldn't be until 1968 that the animals or, in this case, apes would really take over the world. Planet of the Apes was a cultural phenomenon that I really don't need to tell you about, a shock-wave of a franchise that would only need a little time before it sprung into action once more. We never expected the franchise would return like this.

 Posted July 11 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: Bong Joon-ho's 'Snowpiercer' is a Masterpiece of Epic Sci-Fi

Snowpiercer

The saying goes that if you aim for the stars, you just might end up on the moon. Every so often, though, you hit those damn stars, and South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho is no stranger to that level of achievement. He's never done it quite like this, though. His sci-fi epic Snowpiercer is a cinematic accomplishment that barrels its way down the rails of success through intelligent and exciting storytelling, an execution in set and atmosphere that surpasses even the most epic of Hollywood blockbusters, and a slew of top-notch, talent delivering wholly unforgettable performances. Snowpiercer is a masterpiece, rivalling even the best sci-fi in terms of scope and story, and that's saying nothing of its highly inventive conceit.

 Posted July 2 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: Solid Scares Keep 'Deliver Us from Evil' Strong in Tired Genre

Deliver Us from Evil

There's really not a lot that can be done with paranormal thrillers these days. With the recent slate of bland possession movies and the Paranormal Activity juggernaut annually dulling the bump-in-the-night brand of horror, it takes a certain angle at the sub-genre or a top-notch style of delivering the thrills for a film to really play in the haunted sandbox. Luckily, there are those entries that realize the ways in which to keep a fresh game in a stale ballpark, Deliver Us from Evil being the latest of these. Part gritty-NYPD procedural, part sinister-entity horror, the film nails every tone and hits every scare with results that should satisfy any and all downtrodden, horror fans. Thankfully, there are still films that can keep us up at night.

 Posted July 2 in Horror, Review | Comments

Review: Melissa McCarthy's Comedy 'Tammy' Hardly a Real Movie

Tammy

Some defense seems to be in order when it comes to Melissa McCarthy. Ever since she lit up audiences in Bridesmaids, the comedienne has been panned as much as praised, a byproduct of her overweight physicality and choice in taking more prat-fally types of roles. Just because she's an overweight actress does not mean that every joke she makes is a "fat joke," something she's especially getting nailed for with her latest comedy vehicle, Tammy. It's not a one-joke movie, but rather hardly a movie at all. Instead, the movie serves primarily as a showcase for the talents of McCarthy, hitting pratfall after pratfall, goofy gesture after goofy gesture. It can be funny, but the hollowness far outweighs the abundance of humor it serves up.

 Posted July 2 in Review | Comments

Review: 'Transformers: Age of Extinction' is an Epic, Lazy Shit-Storm

Transformers: Age of Extinction

Pardon the pun, but Michael Bay is on cruise control now. At least that's the case with the Transformers franchise. The series of mega-budgeted, summer blockbusters were never going to win awards for excellence in storytelling. Beyond the explosions, mayhem, and people shouting "No" in machine-gun rapidity, there have hardly been stories to gel all the action together. That's what makes Bay's movies so up the alley of anyone looking for escapist fun. Unfortunately, not even the computer graphic carnage and epic scale destruction on display in the latest Transformers sequel, Age of Extinction, can keep the sloppy and lazy attitude into which this franchise has shifted from rearing its ugly, mechanized head.

 Posted June 27 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: 'The Rover' Takes Too Long to Travel Too Short of a Distance

The Rover

As post-apocalyptic thrillers go, The Rover falls more in line with The Road than The Road Warrior. David Michôd’s follow-up to the intense crime drama, Animal Kingdom, is wrought with melancholic atmosphere and low on action-heavy narrative. More low simmer than slow-burn, its drama and action take too many stale side streets and not enough free-flowing highways. As its name implies, The Rover is a road movie, and Michôd creates his end-of-the-world scenario with all the dirt, flies, and gas-guzzlers you would expect in a film from Down Under. This is one road picture that despite heavy performances from Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson, has difficulty going anywhere but headlong towards its end credits.

 Posted June 20 in Indies, Review | Comments

Review: 'How to Train Your Dragon 2' Worthy Sequel to the Original

How Train Your Dragon 2

Did you think DreamWorks Animation would fumble the ball with How to Train Your Dragon 2? The first movie was a smash success, arguably the best animated film of 2010 over Pixar's praised Toy Story 3. At the very least, it was an extremely close race for supremacy, and loads of anticipation fell in the sequel's court as soon as it was announced. The time has come, and though the sequel couldn't possibly have brought the surprise or wow factor of its predecessor, it brings so much more that makes up for it. There's laughs, thrills, and heart of all shapes and sizes. It doesn't rest on just being a kiddie-pleaser and instead brings top-notch storytelling together with impeccable animation that only seems to be getting better and better.

 Posted June 13 in Animation, Review | Comments

Review: Lord & Miller's Hysterical '22 Jump Street' Still in on the Joke

22 Jump Street

The 21 Jump Street big-screen reboot shouldn't have worked. In the film, the leads, newly graduated officers played by Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill, are told the police department has run out of ideas. Rebranding a once-popular idea was all the creativity the department could muster. That was a message for us, that everyone involved was in on the joke. Even Johnny Depp stopped by to be in on it. Against the odds, 21 Jump Street worked. What does Hollywood do with an idea that works? They do the same thing, naturally. Thankfully, the same team (chiefly co-directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller) is back and still in on the joke. 22 Jump Street becomes the Jump Street movie to end all Jump Street movies. Maybe.

 Posted June 12 in Review | Comments

Review: Atmosphere, Suspense Line Jim Mickle's Intense 'Cold in July'

Cold in July

A strange noise in the middle of the night awakens a young couple. The husband, Richard Dane, goes to the closet, opens it, and quietly begins to load his gun. He begins searching the house, walking down the dark hallway towards the living room. Suddenly, a beam from a flashlight shines against the far wall, a light that is coming from within the house. Richard freezes, unable to take in a breath. Panicked. This is the first of many moments that generate a veritable intensity throughout Cold in July, powerful adaptation of the Joe R. Lonsdale crime-thriller novel from We Are What We Are director Jim Mickle. Read more below!

 Posted June 6 in Indies, Review | Comments

Review: Smart, Surprising 'Edge of Tomorrow' Kicks All the Right Ass

Edge of Tomorrow

The name of the movie is Edge of Tomorrow, but the name of the novel that inspired it is All You Need is Kill, definitely a harder hitting title than the safer, more user friendly name Warner Bros. came up with. Oddly enough, the movie's title is more appropriate for the story it tells, but Edge of Tomorrow still lives up to its source material's title, matching it bullet-for-bullet and generally kicking just as much ass. It's a non-stop jolt of summer blockbuster-sized entertainment, made all the more so by an expected charismatic turn from Tom Cruise. Altering and adjusting the novel in all the right ways, Edge of Tomorrow's marriage of story and eye-popping visuals makes it the one to beat for the remainder of the season. Read on!

 Posted June 6 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Review: 'A Million Ways to Die in the West' is Better Than You Think

A Million Ways to Die in the West

The latest victim of false expectations and unbridled vitriol is A Million Ways to Die in the West, the latest comedic effort from writer, director and star Seth MacFarlane. In 2012, the "Family Guy" creator made his directorial debut, along with his first major film role voicing the titular raunchy teddy bear in Ted. But now MacFarlane takes the lead front and center, with no visual effects to hide his face, and he's getting pummeled with bad reviews harder than the giant ice block that crushes a townsman in this Old West comedy. However, the film is not abysmal, has plenty of big laughs, and is deserving of much more praise.

 Posted May 30 in Review | Comments

FEATURED POSTS

GET MORE NEWS

Subscribe to our feed or daily newsletter:
Follow Alex's main profile on twitter:
For the news posts only, follow this acct:
Add our feed to your Feedly: follow us in feedly
Subscribe to me on YouTube for interviews 

POPULAR COMMENTS

NEWEST PODCAST

FACEBOOK + LINKS