REVIEWS

Berlinale 2015: Malick is Back & Better Than Ever with 'Knight of Cups'

Knight of Cups Review

Malick is back! Terrence Malick, I mean, the master filmmaker who never makes public appearances and can sometimes take years to finish editing his films. This time he tackles Hollywood itself, presenting a mesmerizing criticism of the hedonism of Hollywood in a film called Knight of Cups starring Christian Bale as an actor who pretends to be anyone but himself. The film just premiered at the Berlin Film Festival to cheers from critics at the morning press screening. Malick finally found his groove, and Knight of Cups is his best film in years, perhaps even better than The Tree of Life. It weaves a very thin narrative around some of the same metaphysical, religious, meaning-of-life themes that he first began exploring in The Tree of Life.

 Posted February 8 in Berlinale, Review | Comments

Review: 'Jupiter Ascending' is a Mixed Bag of Story and Imagery

Jupiter Ascending

Good or bad, the films of the writing/directing sibling duo, The Wachowskis, have always struck a chord of interest. Even their less respected works either present noteworthy, sci-fi questions or deliver cool, sci-fi extravaganzas for the senses. Jupiter Ascending is their film most deserving of deep deconstruction. It’s a messy film, one that seems to have been sadly cut to shreds by post-production meddling. Its frantic structure and goofy accents keep it on the fringe of landing as highly as many of their previous works, perhaps all of them. For all of its hokey details though, Jupiter Ascending is a true Wachowski sci-fi action adventure that fully delivers the heart-stopping excitement for which we’ve all grown to love them. Read on!

 Posted February 7 in Review, SciFi | Comments

Sundance 2015: 'Tig' is a Heartbreaking Look at Staggering Comedy

Tig

There are infinitely more comedians working today than you realize, but that's only because most people only hear about and go out of their way to see the most famous comics who have specials on Comedy Central and star in their own TV shows. What you may not realize is that there's a long career of not being famous for many comedians before they catch their big break, and even if that breakthrough finally happens, it may not last. That brings me to Tig Notaro, a comedienne who has been in the business for 18 years, but skyrocketed to fame in the past three years after a series of unfortunate events inspired a bold stand-up set.

 Posted February 3 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: An Inside Look at Communism in 'The Chinese Mayor'

The Chinese Mayor

China is a endlessly fascinating country. With a population over 1.3 billion people, it's impressive that they can operate with a communist government yet still thrive and remain as powerful and successful as they currently are. I'm even more curious about the government: how exactly it works, how the entire hierarchy is structured, and how they're able to make progress and push forward when so many seem so vehemently against the system. The documentary The Chinese Mayor, which recently won a Special Jury Prize at Sundance for "Unparalleled Access", is a remarkable inside look at how one ambitious mayor in China tried to revitalize his city with his citizen's best interests at heart in the face of constant opposition. It's fantastic.

 Posted February 2 in Docs, Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: Sarah Silverman is Award Worthy in 'I Smile Back'

I Smile Back

Independent cinema is where some actors go to defy expectations and try roles outside of their comfort zone. You'll find dramatic stars trying out small comedies, and big comedians putting on their best serious face. With I Smile Back, an adaptation of Amy Koppelman's book of the same name, we get the latter. But this isn't just a gimmick of a raunchy comic trying to get dark just for shock value as Sarah Silverman steps into the lead role with flying colors, delivering a brutal, relentless depiction of addiction and sadness as a mother struggling with substance abuse everyday, popping pills, snorting coke and chugging vodka.

 Posted February 2 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: 'How to Dance in Ohio' Brings Tears of Pure Joy

How to Dance in Ohio

Years ago, the documentary American Teen focused on a group of teenagers living in Indiana, focusing on their everyday high school lives. This time a new documentary heads back to the Midwest with How to Dance in Ohio. However, the young adults at the center of this documentary aren't your ordinary teens, because they all have varying autistic spectrum disorders. The film from Alexandra Shiva turns the camera on these socially anxious teens as they prepare for their first spring formal. This is something that can be daunting for teens who don't have to deal with autism, and with these kids it could be disastrous.

 Posted February 2 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: Goofy Religious Antics in Jared Hess' 'Don Verdean'

Don Verdean Review

There are a growing number of recent films that have tried to make a fun joke out of religion, which can sometimes be a sensitive subject (at least in this country). Not many of them are that good, as sometimes they get too dumb with the humor (e.g. Year One), but sometimes they strike the right chord, touching upon both the importance of and hilarity of modern religion. Don Verdean is the latest film from Jared Hess & Jerusha Hess, the husband/wife filmmaker team that brought us Napoleon Dynamite and Gentlemen Broncos previously. Don Verdean is the name of religious artifacts collector who gets into some deep shit.

 Posted January 30 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: The Intense & Riveting 'Stanford Prison Experiment'

The Stanford Prison Experiment

Would you be a better guard or a better prisoner? How would you act? Most of us are inherently familiar with the "Stanford Prison Experiment", the infamously legendary psychology experiment conducted in the 1970s involving a mock prison testing the limits of prisoners against the guards. Many have been trying to adapt this for years, and we finally have a take on it - literally called The Stanford Prison Experiment. Director Kyle Patrick Alvarez (of C.O.G. from Sundance 2013) along with screenwriter Tim Talbott bring to life the intense, brutal mock prison setup in the basement of a Stanford building. It's riveting to watch, and will be divisive just based on how crazy it gets. But we all knew it would go this far, right? Right?

 Posted January 29 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: 'Me and Earl and the Dying Girl' Touches the Heart

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

It's best not to get too sappy, but I can't help it with this film. It had me, and almost everyone in the theater, wiping away tears. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is another wonderful surprise gem from Sundance 2015 that is inspiring, entertaining, moving and made for anyone who has a heart (which is, technically, everyone but you know what I mean). It's a film made by die-hard film lovers that tells a very heartbreaking but sincere story not of young romance, but of young enthusiasm, a love for people and the joy of making them smile. It's built around sadness yet inspired by the pursuit of happiness, and it will make everyone cry.

 Posted January 26 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: Bel Powley Amazes in 'The Diary of a Teenage Girl'

The Diary of a Teenage Girl

In the world of indie films, the coming-of-age storyline is a popular one. But because we're all different, maturing in ways that aren't identical, that makes for a variety of great stories with similar themes. In this case, director Marielle Heller launches her career with The Diary of a Teenage Girl, based on the graphic novel of the same name by Phoebe Gloeckner, which follows 15-year old Minnie Goetze (Bel Powley) growing up in the heart of San Francisco in the drug friendly 1970s, quickly and aggressively exploring her sexuality. However, making things complicated is the fact that this happens with Monroe (Alexander Skarsgard), the boyfriend of her mother (Kristen Wiig). The result is a stupendous film.

 Posted January 26 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: Invigorating Post-Apoc Drama in 'Z for Zachariah'

Z for Zachariah

A few years ago at Sundance, director Craig Zobel unleashed his film Compliance upon audiences, earning rave reviews and critical responses from those who felt it went too far. Zobel, who has a steady hand and refined vision, returns to Sundance this year with Z for Zachariah, and adaptation of a book that takes place in a very small town with the few remaining people that have survived after a nuclear apocalypse. The central character is Ann, played by the astonishing Margot Robbie (from The Wolf of Wall Street), who ends up in a bit of a love triangle after two different men show up. This invigorating sci-fi is my kind of film.

 Posted January 25 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: National Lampoon's 'Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead' is a Must-See Lesson in Comedy History

Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead

Sadly, for anyone under the age of 30, the name National Lampoon is synonymous with terrible straight-to-DVD comedies, with the exception of the more celebrated films of the Vacation franchise (the original and Christmas Vacation). However, National Lampoon has a legacy that stretches decades as it served as the launching point for some of the most iconic talents in comedy, both in front of the camera and behind it. Without National Lampoon, there may not be a "Saturday Night Live" or Ghostbusters. The documentary Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead takes an in-depth look at the rise and fall of the adult humor magazine.

 Posted January 25 in Docs, Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: 'Sleeping with Other People' is RomCom Done Right

Sleeping with Other People

One of my favorite romantic comedies of all time is When Harry Met Sally. It's classic, timeless and delivers the perfect depiction of friendship between the opposite sexes, dating and relationships. And while countless films have tried to duplicate the brilliance of director Rob Reiner and writer Nora Eprhon, many of them fall tragically short. But thankfully, we have Sleeping with Other People from Bachelorette writer and director Leslye Headland, and this is hopefully as close as we'll get to what is essentially a remake of the aforementioned 1989 romantic comedy staple. But the film has a style and attitude all its own.

 Posted January 25 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

Sundance 2015: Rick Famuyiwa's 'Dope' is Smart, Funny, The Best Yet

Dope

Wow. This was the film I was waiting to discover at Sundance 2015. Rick Famuyiwa's Dope is one of the best films I've seen at Sundance so far: refreshingly unique, incredibly smart, hilarious throughout, edgy, and subversive in the way it challenges typical cliches of urban storytelling. Dope is a coming-of-age film about a kid from "the bottoms" in Inglewood, California who is a big geek, not the expected thug, and in his final year of high school ends up in a wacky debacle that may help him end up right where he belongs. It's awesome, really, this film rules and everyone is going to be talking about it. I loved it, from the soundtrack to the performances, it's a breakout from this year's festival and should connect with many movie lovers.

 Posted January 25 in Review, Sundance 15 | Comments

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